add to wish list | library


14 of 14 recommend this,
would you recommend it?

yes | no

Support this site by purchasing from these vendors using the links provided below. As an Amazon Associate SA-CD.net earns from qualifying purchases.
 
amazon.ca
amazon.co.uk
amazon.com
amazon.de
 
amazon.fr
amazon.it
CDJapan
 

Discussion: Mahler: Symphony No. 3 - Bernstein

Posts: 11
Page: 1 2 next

Post by sperlsco December 10, 2007 (1 of 11)
I'm not sure if it can be considered a full review, but I posted a general review of three of the Sony/Japan SACD releases of Bernstein's first Mahler cycle. It consists of comments pertaining to all three of the releases, not just the M3.

Scott

Post by Allen December 10, 2007 (2 of 11)
You mentioned that it is more than 3 channels? That is a little surprising, because in Sony's own page, I thought I read it is supposed to be only 3 channels, so there should not be anything in the rear channels. Could you confirm?

Post by volund December 10, 2007 (3 of 11)
sperlsco writes:

It is rather strange that the sounds cuts off quickly at the end of some of the movements (M3-1, M3-6, M7-5 are very noticeable).



Sperlsco, I am in complete agreement with you (and many others, besides), about the practically definitive status of Lenny's Columbia Mahler 3rd. I would have been eager to acquire a first-rate SACD transfer at whatever price, but your review has tempered my prior enthusiasm. I am concerned about the noticeably abrupt cutoffs in M3-1 and M3-6. The M3 is the Mahler work that says the most to me, and the unwelcome prospect of sudden truncations in the final chords of the codas to both movements is a nearly sufficient disincentive for me not to want to hear the SACD transfer at all.

Are the truncations so abrupt that they occur during the final chords (as do some redbook CDs of early vintage)? Or did the remastering engineers "only" truncate the reverberations of the final chords? If the latter, I might be able to live with the results, if they are not very severe. If the former, there is no way.

Post by terence December 11, 2007 (4 of 11)
Allen said:

You mentioned that it is more than 3 channels? That is a little surprising, because in Sony's own page, I thought I read it is supposed to be only 3 channels, so there should not be anything in the rear channels. Could you confirm?

same query re. number of channels - could somebody confirm for certain whether this whole series is 3.0 or 5.0? there seems to be a lot of confusion on the issue.

Post by sperlsco December 11, 2007 (5 of 11)
volund said:

sperlsco writes:

Are the truncations so abrupt that they occur during the final chords (as do some redbook CDs of early vintage)? Or did the remastering engineers "only" truncate the reverberations of the final chords? If the latter, I might be able to live with the results, if they are not very severe. If the former, there is no way.

To my ears, it is the reverberation that has been truncated. If you can wait until after the weekend, I will certainly be listening to these again to confirm. I don't remember ANY type of truncation on my Bernstein Century box set, so this caught me by surprise.

As for the question on the rear channels, they are indeed used very sparingly for ambient sound. I actually needed to put my ear right next to the speakers to hear it. However, when I turned up the volume of the rear speakers (by 9db!), I was able to hear them more easily.


Scott

Post by rosenkavalier817 December 22, 2007 (6 of 11)
sperlsco said:

To my ears, it is the reverberation that has been truncated. If you can wait until after the weekend, I will certainly be listening to these again to confirm. I don't remember ANY type of truncation on my Bernstein Century box set, so this caught me by surprise.

As for the question on the rear channels, they are indeed used very sparingly for ambient sound. I actually needed to put my ear right next to the speakers to hear it. However, when I turned up the volume of the rear speakers (by 9db!), I was able to hear them more easily.


Scott

My very sweet girlfriend got me the Mahler 2nd from this series. I listened for the first time this morning and absolutely loved the remastering. I would like to get a few more, but they are a bit expensive. I'm not familiar with this series from Bernstein, but would anyone recommend any of the symphonies as being "must have" from this series if one were only to get a few recordings?

Thanks!

Post by terence December 23, 2007 (7 of 11)
hi RK, were you listening in stereo or multichannel?

if the latter, can you say how much/little the rear speakers are used in the mix?

i too am interested in buying some of these, but as you say they are pricey.

Post by robstl December 23, 2007 (8 of 11)
terence said:

same query re. number of channels - could somebody confirm for certain whether this whole series is 3.0 or 5.0? there seems to be a lot of confusion on the issue.

I don't have no. 3 yet, but I just got #7 and #6/9, and they are 5.0. I'm not sure how they derived the surround information from the original 3-channel masters the Sony Japan website describes. The surround channels are used in a fairly subtle fashion; I wouldn't say they give much of a sense of a hall space. They do seem to aid the instument positioning perspective some without blunting impact at all. I think sperlsco's review is right on target regarding the sound (as applied to discs I've heard so far). I would add, for those that don't know the recordings from RBCD or LP, that these are up-close, almost right-in-the-orchestra recordings with some stage noises (e.g. page turns). The remastering (to the credit of the engineers in my view) doesn't change this.

So far I'm impressed with these. If I have the chance, I'll try to do some direct sound comparisons with the RBCDs, but based on memory I think there's a substantial improvement.

-Rob

Post by terence December 23, 2007 (9 of 11)
robstl said:

I don't have no. 3 yet, but I just got #7 and #6/9, and they are 5.0. I'm not sure how they derived the surround information from the original 3-channel masters the Sony Japan website describes.

artificially (i.e. by computer trickery) i guess. i can't see any other way of doing it unless sony also had access to tapes containing information from microphones feeding into (i.e. "mixed down" into) the three-channel masters you mention.

i think i'm right in saying there are certainly SOME bernstein/NYPO recordings made in genuine quadraphonic, but this mahler series appears not to be among them, and in that respect to be similar to the mercury living presence three-front-channel-only set-up. the rear two channels having been added artificially to enable these sony japan recordings to be dubbed 5.0, and therefore (i guess) potentially attractive to a broader market.

from what you say and what i've read elsewhere they can't actually be genuine 5.0 recordings as there appear to be no 5-channel (or more) master tapes to work with.

thanks for this R.

Post by rosenkavalier817 December 23, 2007 (10 of 11)
terence said:

hi RK, were you listening in stereo or multichannel?

if the latter, can you say how much/little the rear speakers are used in the mix?

i too am interested in buying some of these, but as you say they are pricey.

I was listening in multichannel, and if the rear channels were being used, it was incredibly little. I even turned them up all the way and the sound coming from them was very faint.. I only got to listen once yesterday before I left town for a week, so I'll try to listen more when I get back. Hope this helps...

Cheers

Page: 1 2 next

Closed